Teretismata  

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"So goodbye to the Platonic Forms. They are teretismata, and have nothing to do with our speech." --Posterior Analytics, Aristotle

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Teretismata (Greek τερετίσματα, lit. “chirruping”) is a Greek term to describe "the twittering of birds or a person's aimless humming."[1] Another translation is meaningless sounds. In his work Posterior Analytics, Aristotle uses it to criticize Plato's Theory of Forms.

Greek original:

Τα γάρ είδη χαιρέτω - τερετίσματα γάρ έστι, και, ει έστιν, ουδέν προς τον λόγον έστίν

Latin translation:

"valeant enim ideae, quia sunt teretismata; et si re vera sint, nihil tamen ad hunc sermonein pertinent: non enim demonstratlones de rebus hulusmodi sunt." --Aristotle, Immanuel Bekker, ‎Christian August Brandis

English translation:

"So goodbye to the Platonic Forms. They are teretismata, and have nothing to do with our speech" (Posterior Analytics 83a32-4).

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