The Dark Side of the Moon  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Dark Side of the Moon (titled Dark Side of the Moon in the 1993 CD edition) is a concept album by the English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on 17 March 1973 in the United States and 24 March 1973 in the United Kingdom.

The Dark Side of the Moon built on the ideas Pink Floyd had explored in their live shows and recordings, but it lacked the extended instrumental excursions which had characterised their work following the departure of founding member, principal composer and lyricist, Syd Barrett. The album's themes include conflict, greed, aging, and mental illness (or "insanity"), the latter partly inspired by Barrett's deteriorating mental state.

Developed during the band's live concert tours, it was recorded between 1972 and 1973 at Abbey Road Studios in London, making use of some of the most advanced studio techniques of the time. Innovative ideas included multitracking, analogue synthesizers, and tape loops.

The band's most commercially successful release, The Dark Side of the Moon is often considered to be their magnum opus, and is frequently ranked by music critics as one of the greatest and most influential albums of all time.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Dark Side of the Moon" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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