The Egoist (periodical)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Egoist was a London literary magazine published from 1914 to 1919, during which time it published early modernist works, including those of James Joyce and T.S. Eliot. It was founded by Dora Marsden, a successor to her The New Freewoman. The subtitle was An Individualist Review.

Marsden was the editor in the first half of 1914, when it was a fortnightly. For most of its life it was a monthly. Editorship was then taken over by Harriet Shaw Weaver. Assistant editors were Richard Aldington and Leonard A. Compton-Rickett, with H. D.. When Aldington left in 1917 for the Army, his place was taken by T. S. Eliot.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Egoist (periodical)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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