The Paris Review  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Paris Review is an English-language literary magazine based in New York City. As its name suggests it was founded in Paris in 1953, for "the good writers and good poets, the non-drumbeaters and non-axe grinders. So long as they're good." It is best known for author interviews, in which the authors tell in their own words the craft of writing and criticisms of their own works; as well as a forum for new and upcoming authors. Prior to 2005 it focused on prose fiction and poetry, after which it also included non-fiction pieces and authors. Some of the best work first published in The Paris Review are now available in book anthology form. The Paris Review awards a number of prizes each year.

Contributors

Author interviews include Chinua Achebe, J. G. Ballard, Samuel Beckett, Joseph Brodsky, Italo Calvino, Simone de Beauvoir, Isak Dinesen, Lawrence Durrell, E. M. Forster, Athol Fugard, Gabriel García Márquez, Nadine Gordimer, Henry Green, Graham Greene, Seamus Heaney, P. D. James, Philip Larkin, Malcolm Lowry, Ian McEwan, Paul Muldoon, Haruki Murakami, Les Murray, Vladimir Nabokov, V. S. Naipaul, Harold Pinter, and Derek Walcott.

American authors interviewed include Nelson Algren, Paul Auster, James Baldwin, Elizabeth Bishop, Paul Bowles, Christopher Browne, William S. Burroughs, Truman Capote, Raymond Carver, Ralph Ellison, Allen Ginsberg, Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, Mary McCarthy, Marianne Moore, Wright Morris, Ezra Pound, Adrienne Rich, Philip Roth, Terry Southern, John Updike, Kurt Vonnegut, Eugene Walter and John Edgar Wideman.

Contemporary fiction writers and poets include Miranda July, Ai, Donald Antrim, Alessandro Baricco, Rick Bass, Jim Carroll, Jeffrey Eugenides, Linda Gregg, Mohsin Hamid, Ann Hood, Daniel Kehlmann, Michael McFee, Lorrie Moore, Rick Moody, Mark Rudman, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, and Brenda Shaughnessy.

Critics interviewed include Harold Bloom, John Simon, George Steiner, and Helen Vendler.

For a more extensive list of contributors to the magazine, see the back issue section of The Paris Review's official site.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Paris Review" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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