The Poetics of Space  

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"The difficulty that had to be overcome (…) was to avoid all geometrical evidence. In other words, I had to start with a sort of intimacy of roundness."


"The concept that corresponds to a shell is so clear, so hard, and so sure that a poet, unable simply to draw it and, reduced rather to speaking of it, is at first at a loss for images"


"Sometimes the house of the future is better built, lighter and larger than all the houses of the past, so that the image of the dream house is opposed to that of the childhood home…. Maybe it is a good thing for us to keep a few dreams of a house that we shall live in later, always later, so much later, in fact, that we shall not have time to achieve it. For a house that was final, one that stood in symmetrical relation to the house we were born in, would lead to thoughts—serious, sad thoughts—and not to dreams. It is better to live in a state of impermanence than in one of finality."


"When we examine a nest, we place ourselves at the origin of confidence in the world"

Bird's Nest and Ferns (1863) by Fidelia Bridges"When we examine a nest, we place ourselves at the origin of confidence in the world." -—Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space
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Bird's Nest and Ferns (1863) by Fidelia Bridges
"When we examine a nest, we place ourselves at the origin of confidence in the world." -—Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Poetics of Space (Fr: La Poétique de l'espace) is a philosophy book by Gaston Bachelard first published in French in 1958. Bachelard applies the method of phenomenology to architecture basing his analysis not on purported origins (as was the trend in enlightenment thinking about architecture) but on lived experience of architecture. He is thus led to consider spatial types such as the attic, the cellar, drawers and the like. This book implicitly urges architects to base their work on the experiences it will engender rather than on abstract rationales that may or may not affect viewers and users of architecture.

It was translated into English by Maria Jolas and published by Beacon Press.

Chapters

  1. The House. From Cellar to Garret. The significance of the Hut
  2. House and Universe
  3. Drawers, Chests and Wardrobes
  4. Nests
  5. Shells
  6. Corners
  7. Miniature
  8. Intimate Immensity
  9. The Dialectics of Outside and Inside
  10. The Phenomenology of Roundness

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Poetics of Space" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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