The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory  

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The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory (1983) is a book by Tania Modleski in which she examens the role of women in Hitchcock's films.

The Women Who Knew Too Much consists of a theoretical introduction and analyses of seven films by Alfred Hitchcock, each of which provides a basis for an analysis of the female spectator as well as of the male spectator.

Blurb:

"Tania Modleski claims that critical approaches to Hitchcock have falsely fallen into two camps: either he is seen as a misogynist, or he is seen as sympathetic to women in his demonstration of women's plight in patriarchy. In opposition to these positions, Modleski asserts that Hitchcock is ambivalent towards his female characters. Applying the theories of psychoananlysis, mass culture, and a broad range of film and feminist criticism, Modleski presents careful and fascinating readings of seven Hitchcock films from various periods in his career." --from the publisher





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