Universal Natural History and Theory of Heaven  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Universal Natural History and Theory of Heaven (German:Allgemeine Naturgeschichte und Theorie des Himmels) is a work written by Immanuel Kant in 1755.

According to Kant, our solar system is merely a smaller version of the fixed star systems, such as the Milky Way and other galaxies. Kant's theory is closer to today's accepted ideas than some of his contemporary thinkers such as Pierre-Simon Laplace.

In his pre-critical period, philosopher Immanuel Kant advocated a remarkably similar embodied view of the mind-body problem that was part of his Universal Natural History and Theory of Heaven (1755).




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Universal Natural History and Theory of Heaven" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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