Wilhelm Fraenger  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Wilhelm Fraenger (b. 5 June 1890 , Erlangen - d. 19 February 1964 , Potsdam) was a German art historian.

Fraenger was a specialist in the epoch of the German Peasants' War and of the mysticism of the Late Middle Ages. He wrote important studies of Jerg Ratgeb, Matthias Grünewald and Hieronymus Bosch. His work on Bosch was very influential in its day and considered Bosch under the aspect of occultism, seeing Bosch as an artist guided by an esoteric mysticism.

In his book The Millennium of Hieronymus Bosch, Fränger wrote that Bosch was a member of the heretical sect known as the Adamites—who were also known as the Homines intelligentia and Brethren and Sisters of the Free Spirit.

Veröffentlichungen

  • Jörg Ratgeb. Ein Maler und Märtyrer aus dem Bauernkrieg. Hrsg. v. Gustel Fraenger u. Ingeborg Baier-Fraenger. Verlag der Kunst, Dresden 1972.
  • Hieronymus Bosch. Mit einem Beitrag von Patrik Reuterswärd. Verlag der Kunst, Dresden 1975.
  • Von Bosch bis Beckmann. Aufsätze aus der Zeit von 1920 bis 1957. Verlag der Kunst, Dresden 1977.
    • Zeitzeichen. Streifzüge von Bosch bis Beckmann. Einleitung Carl Zuckmayer. Verlag der Kunst, Dresden 1996. ISBN 3-932981-91-X
  • Die Radierungen des Hercules Seghers. Ein physiognomischer Versuch. Eugen Rentsch, München/Leipzig 1922, Reclam, Leipzig 1984.
  • Matthias Grünewald. Verlag der Kunst, Dresden 1995. ISBN 3-364-00324-6
  • Formen des Komischen. Vorträge 1920–1921. Philo, Hamburg 1995. ISBN 3-86572-557-0




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Wilhelm Fraenger" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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