Xenophilia  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Xenophily or xenophilia means an affection for unknown/foreign objects or people. It is the opposite of xenophobia or xenophoby. The word is a modern coinage from the Greek "xenos" (Template:Lang) (stranger, unknown, foreign) and "philia" (Template:Lang) (love, attraction), though the word itself is not found in classical Greek.

In culture

Cultural xenophilia according to some sources can be connected with cultural cringe, or the feeling that one's own culture is inferior. It may also be area-specific, such as led the Romans to believe that Greeks were better than Romans at music, art and philosophy, but evidently not better at military matters.


In fiction

Xenophilia is a theme found in science fiction, primarily the space opera subgenre, in which one explores the consequences of love and sexual intercourse between humans and extraterrestrials, particularly humanoid ones. A satirical example is XXXenophile, an X-rated comic book written by Phil Foglio. A more somber example is the relationship of Sarek and Amanda Grayson (Spock's parents) in Star Trek. In the Mass Effect (series) of video games, there are also multiple examples of xenophilia between the main character Commander Shepard and his or her alien shipmates.

In the book Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, a character named Xenophilius Lovegood (the father of one of Harry Potter's more eccentric friends, Luna Lovegood) is characterized by his interest in unusual or unknown objects, animals, and concepts – as his name unmistakably implies.

The film Watermelon Man centers in part on a white man trying to have sex with a white woman he works with. His efforts fail until he is magically turned into an African American, at which point she is more than willing to sleep with him. It is only the following day that the protagonist realizes, to his horror, that the woman is a xenophile and only had sex with him because of his race; she had no interest in him as a person.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Xenophilia" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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