The French are worshippers of the great goddess Lubricity  

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"What man is there that knoweth not how that the city of the French is a worshipper of the great goddess Lubricity?"--Discourses in America (1885) by Matthew Arnold


"In 1885 Arnold wrote an article on America for the Nineteenth Century, and went out of his way to say that “the French” are “at present vowed to the worship of the great goddess Lubricity.”--French and English (1889) by Philip Gilbert Hamerton


"Some might have seen the very striking article on the present state of France in The Nineteenth Century. Mr. Myers in the article entitled “The disenchantment of France, " pointed out that this kind of literature had led to the decay of all belief in a noble ideal of life, and the degradation into which, what the late Mr. Matthew Arnold called the "Worship of the great goddess of Lubricity," had plunged the country, was vividly pourtrayed. Such garbage was simply death to a nation."--"Pernicious Literature" (1889) by National Vigilance Association

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"The French are worshippers of the great goddess Lubricity" is a dictum by Matthew Arnold recorded in "Numbers; or, The Majority and the Remnant" and collected in Discourses in America (1885).

Its original phrasing reads:

"What man is there that knoweth not how that the city of the French is a worshipper of the great goddess Lubricity?"

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