MIT Press  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The MIT Press is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA). The core focus of its books and journals are the subjects of Art & Architecture, the Cognitive Sciences, Computer Science, Economics, Environmental Science, Neuroscience, New Media, and Science, Technology, & Society.

The Press has published more than 8,000 books throughout its history, and publishes about 200 books and 40 journals every year.

The MIT Press was created in 1932 as an imprint called Technology Press. It became an independent publishing house and acquired its modern name in 1962. In 1981, The MIT Press published its first book, Brainstorms: Philosophical Essays on Mind and Psychology by Daniel C. Dennett, under the Bradford Books imprint.

The MIT Press is a distributor for such publishers as Zone Books and Semiotext(e).

The MIT Press also operates a bookstore highlighting its output, along with complementary works from other publishers, near its Cambridge headquarters. The store is located next to the Kendall Square station of the MBTA Red Line in Cambridge.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "MIT Press" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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