Mees' lines  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Mees' lines or Aldrich–Mees' lines, also called leukonychia striata, are lines of discoloration across the nails of the fingers and toes.

Contents

Causes

Mees' lines appear after an episode of poisoning with arsenic, thallium or other heavy metals, and can also appear if the subject is suffering from renal failure. They have been observed in chemotherapy patients.

Presentation

They are typically white bands traversing the width of the nail. As the nail grows they move towards the end, and finally disappear when trimmed.

Eponym and history

Although the phenomenon is named after Dutch physician R.A. Mees, who described the abnormality in 1919, earlier descriptions of the same abnormality were made by Englishman E. S. Reynolds in 1901 and by American C. J. Aldrich in 1904.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mees' lines" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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