Pliny the Younger  

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Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus, born Gaius Caecilius or Gaius Caecilius Cilo (Born: 61 A.D. - Died: ca. 112 A.D.), better known as Pliny the Younger, was a lawyer, author, and magistrate of Ancient Rome. Pliny's uncle, Pliny the Elder, helped raise and educate him and they were both witnesses to the eruption of Vesuvius on August 24, 79 AD, the day of the elder's death.

Pliny is known for his hundreds of surviving letters, which are an invaluable historical source for the period. Many are to reigning emperors or to notables such as the historian, Tacitus. Pliny himself was a notable figure, serving as an imperial magistrate under Trajan.

Pliny was considered an honest and moderate man and rose through a series of Imperial civil and military offices, the cursus honorum (see below). He was a friend of the historian Tacitus and employed the biographer Suetonius in his staff. Pliny also came into contact with many other well-known men of the period, including the philosophers Artemidorus and Euphrates during his time in Syria.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pliny the Younger" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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