Replica  

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 There is no original of a print, unless referring to the intaglio.  Illustration: The Sleep of Reason Produces Monstersis a 1799 print by Goya
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There is no original of a print, unless referring to the intaglio.
Illustration: The Sleep of Reason Produces Monstersis a 1799 print by Goya

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A replica is an exact reproduction (as of a painting) executed by the original artist or a copy or reproduction, especially one on a scale smaller than the original.

A replica is a copying closely resembling the original concerning its shape and appearance.

Sometimes the original never existed as in the printmaking, where only states exist. The original of a print is a woodcut (the actual piece of wood used to print the copy) or the intaglio (for example the copper plate).

However, replicas have often been used illegally for forgery and counterfeits, especially of money and coins, but also commercial merchandise such as designer label clothing, luxury bags and accessories, and luxury watches. In arts or historic cars, the term "replica" is used for discussing the non-original recreation, sometimes hiding its real identity.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Replica" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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