The Saturday Evening Post  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Saturday Evening Post is a weekly magazine, most known for the edition published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. From 1897, it was published by Curtis Publishing Company. Curtis claimed the magazine was descended from The Pennsylvania Gazette, founded in 1728 by Benjamin Franklin, although the magazine's first issue was published more than 30 years after Franklin's death. According to historians and circulation numbers, the magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of its editor (1899-1937) George Horace Lorimer.

The Saturday Evening Post published current events articles, editorials, human interest pieces, humor, illustrations, a letter column, poetry (including work written by readers), single-panel cartoons and stories. It was known for commissioning lavish illustrations and original works of fiction. The illustrations were featured on the cover, and embedded in stories and advertising. Some Post illustrations became popular and continue to be reproduced as posters or prints, especially those by Norman Rockwell.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Saturday Evening Post" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools