Benevolence  

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Innocence (1893) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Both young children and lambs are symbols of goodness
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Innocence (1893) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Both young children and lambs are symbols of goodness

"It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest." --The Wealth of Nations (1776)

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  1. disposition to do good
  2. charitable kindness
  3. an altruistic gift or act

Etymology

Circa 1400, original sense “good will, disposition to do good”, Old French benivolence from Latin benevolentia (also directly from Latin), literally “good will”, from bene (“well, good”) + volentia, form of volēns, form of volō (“I wish”), components cognate to English benefit and voluntary, more distantly will (via Proto-Indo-European).

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Benevolence" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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