Pausanias of Athens  

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"In Plato's Symposium the speech of Pausanias distinguishes two manifestations of Aphrodite, Aphrodite Ourania ("heavenly" Aphrodite), and Aphrodite Pandemos ("Common" Aphrodite)."

Pausanias, ( Flourished circa 420 BCE) an Athenian of the deme Kerameis, and was the lover of the poet Agathon.

Although Pausanias is given a significant speaking part in Plato's Symposium, very little is known about him. Ancient anecdotes tend to address only his relationship with Agathon and give us no information about his personal accomplishments. Around 407 he removed himself from Athens to the court of the Macedonian king, Archelaus.

Pausanias appears briefly in two other Socratic dialogues, Plato's Protagoras and Xenophon's Symposium. Pausanias is also mentioned in Book V of Athenaeus' Deipnosophistae, and in Book II of Claudius Aelianus' Varia Historia.




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